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DPDK Governing Board Meeting Summary – 6/20/23

By Announcements, Blog

Tech Board Updates
The 23.07 release of DPDK is in the works, and stabilization work is underway to prep for a July release. Release notes link up has occurred. The API freeze happened along with the C1 on the week of June 5th, and the PMD feature freeze is anticipated for June 21. Extensive work is also underway to clear up a large backlog of patches. Finally, there has been extensive internal discussion about when and how to break ABI and API; policy is already in place for both, but there has been internal discussion about how the community would like to see things change in this area.

Community Lab Updates
A number of patch series have been submitted by UNH to the DPDK CI public repository and are being reviewed for formatting and maintenance aesthetics. Once that review is done, merges will take place. These are the final setups as deployed in the lab, and the lab is running with them. This has been submitted to the CI, and they will merge this before the end of June, assuming that everything looks satisfactory. There is additional development work happening with respect to DTS; the target is to get these in as part of the 23.07 release. Following this release, the lab will start automatically testing with DTS. The upstream improvements that go into DTS upstream will be automatically deployed in the lab. There has also been additional change with respect to distros being maintained in the lab. Fedora 35-36 are end of life, so the lab has moved on to Fedora 37-38. And finally, the lab is working on hardening up some of its reporting.

Events Summary
DPDK Summit 2023 is planned for September 12-13 in Dublin Ireland; the CFP is live and accepting proposals, and registrations are underway. There was brief discussion about the possibility of adding an additional on-site DPDK event for either late September 2023 or November or December 2023, but this is only a matter of discussion. This matter is still under review.

Finance Updates
There have not been significant changes in this area. The project is in a healthy financial place, with a decent surplus, and putting available monies toward additional investments that are being used to promote the project and grow the community.

Marcomms Updates
As DPDK’s new marketing coordinator, Ben Thomas of Linux Foundation has been strategically increasing the project’s presence with a multi-tiered approach that includes: publishing the monthly newsletter (on the DPDK website with its own tab), ramping up social media, developing and publishing multiple end user stories with several ready for publication and others soon to be, updating DPDK’s summit branding, and reviewing all channel analytics and responding accordingly.

DPDK Governing Board Meeting Summary – 4/26/23

By Announcements, Blog

Introduction of New Participants:

Two new participants in the project were introduced to the board: tech writer David Thomas, who begins his contract on the project on June 12th, and marketing coordinator Benjamin Thomas of the Linux Foundation.

Community Lab Updates

A winter storm temporarily deprived the Community Lab of power in January. More recently, FIPS testing has been brought online, catching up the DPDK sample application to the formats used by NIST and their ACVP API, the automated process to move their encryption test vectors to/from their systems for validation. This was merged into the 22.11 release. Arm brought a new hardware system into the lab based on the Ultra CPU. Test coverage has also been extended for all applicable OSes to arm64 systems, effectively doubling the coverage. The Lab is continuing to contribute to the DTS improvements and merge into the DPDK main line. The RFC patch for DTS smoke tests has been submitted for the 23.07 release.  And finally,  in terms of bare metal and NIC enhancements, per the 2023 lab plans, each Gold member has been contacted about their desired NIC upgrade(s) or expansion(s) for the lab’s coverage. Initial responses led to a multiphase plan including: the purchase of three NICs, with three direct installs into existing servers and the third installed into a server donated by intel; the development of a plan for a 4th NIC that will involve retiring an older NIC, having a gold member request to select an alternate, and exploring alternate server install locations; and the gathering of information on two additional requests that were non-NICs/development platforms. 

Tech Board Updates

DPDK 23.03 was released recently. In addition to this there were still some new devices/drivers/libraries happening on the project – including support for Arkville cards, which is an RTL for FPGAs for the PCI side. There was a new driver to support one of Intel’s new IPU chips, a smart NIC with an ASIC, and there was a machine learning library MLL – a library to expose some machine learning accelerators had by Marvell on their chips under SLCs.  In addition to the new hardware/drivers/libraries, DPDK has new crypto, new algorithms, updates to many drivers. In terms of hardware offloading, for RT flow, there are new rules.  Regarding LTS releases, 3 streams are in progress: 20.11, 21.11, and 22.11. 

Financial Updates

The project retains a healthy financial surplus. Current projections for 2023 expenditures have increased slightly given the hire of David Thomas as Tech Writer, the approval of travel reimbursements for Governing Board and Tech Board Members for the Dublin 2023 Userspace Event, and a slight increase in marketing allotments for coordinator Benjamin Thomas. The project’s revenues for 2023 are now projected to be close to its expenditures. 

Marketing Updates

Newly appointed marketing coordinator Ben Thomas, from the Linux Foundation, laid out a metric-driven strategy to more effectively and broadly reach the DPDK community in the months ahead. He observed that outstanding work is happening around the project and in its community, but DPDK needs a greater volume of content, sent out more frequently and strategically, to keep everyone informed of recent developments. Mr. Thomas presented a two-phase strategy to make this happen, that included maintaining current membership status through 2024 renewals by increasing brand awareness, and increasing the user and contributor base by boosting community reach and awareness.  Mr. Thomas then laid out a plan for systematically mapping out the KPIs across the website and across social media, falling into categories including website, social media, live video webinars, email communications, blogs and collateral, and PR outreach. These strategies will be carried out in the months ahead.


Event Updates

The DPDK Governing Board previously approved budget coverage of select Governing Board and Tech Board expenses for Userspace 2023, to take place in Dublin, Ireland from Sep. 12-13, 2023. The project is still working on securing a venue for the event, and exploring several options with Events Coordinator Evi Harmon, of the Linux Foundation. In the weeks and months ahead, Ms. Harmon’s team plans to coordinate various critical aspects of event planning that include launching the CFP, setting up and launching an event website, setting up event registration, and ultimately posting the speaker agenda once it has been decided by the Program Committee. The Events Team will be onsite in Dublin during Userspace to ensure a successful experience for all onsite and virtual attendees. 

DPDK Issues 20.11, Most Robust DPDK Release Ever!

By Announcements, Blog

A new major DPDK release is now available: https://fast.dpdk.org/rel/dpdk-20.11.tar.xz

Our Thanksgiving gift to the ecosystem is the biggest DPDK release ever, with:

  •     2195 commits from 214 authors
  •     2665 files changed, 269546 insertions(+), 107426 deletions(-)

The branch 20.11 should be supported for at least two years, making it recommended for system integration and deployment. The maintainer of this new LTS is Kevin Traynor.

The new major ABI version is 21. The next releases 21.02, 21.05 and 21.08 will be ABI compatible with 20.11.

Below are some new features, grouped by category.

  • General
    • mbuf dynamic area increased from 16 to 36 bytes
    • ring zero cop
    • SIMD bitwidth limit API
    • Windows PCI netuio
    • moved igb_uio to dpdk-kmods/linux
    • removed Python 2 support
    • removed Make support
  • Networking
    •  FEC AP
    • Rx buffer split
    • thread safety in flow API
    • shared action in flow API
    •  flow sampling and mirroring
    • tunnel offload API
    •  multi-port hairpin
    • Solarflare EF100 architecture
    • Wangxun txgbe driver
    • vhost-vDPA backend in virtio-user
    • removed vhost dequeue zero-copy
    •  removed legacy ethdev filtering
    • SWX pipeline aligned with P4
  • Baseband
    • Intel ACC100 driver
  • Cryptography
    • raw datapath API
    • Broadcom BCMFS symmetric crypto driver
  • RegEx
    • Marvell OCTEON TX2 regex driver
  • Others
    • Intel DLB/DLB2 drivers
    • Intel DSA support in IOAT driver

More details in the release notes:https://doc.dpdk.org/guides/rel_notes/release_20_11.html

There are 64 new contributors (including authors, reviewers and testers). Welcome to Aidan Goddard, Amit Bernstein, Andrey Vesnovaty, Artur Rojek, Benoît Ganne, Brandon Lo, Brian Johnson, Brian Poole, Christophe Grosse, Churchill Khangar, Conor Walsh, David Liu, Dawid Lukwinski, Diogo Behrens, Dongdong Liu, Franck Lenormand, Galazka Krzysztof, Guoyang Zhou, Haggai Eran, Harshitha Ramamurthy, Ibtisam Tariq, Ido Segev, Jay Jayatheerthan, Jiawen Wu, Jie Zhou, John Alexander, Julien Massonneau, Jørgen Østergaard Sloth, Khoa To, Li Zhang, Lingli Chen, Liu Tianjiao, Maciej Rabeda, Marcel Cornu, Mike Ximing Chen, Muthurajan Jayakumar, Nan Chen, Nick Connolly, Norbert Ciosek, Omkar Maslekar, Padraig Connolly, Piotr Bronowski, Przemyslaw Ciesielski, Qin Sun, Radha Mohan Chintakuntla, Rani Sharoni, Raveendra Padasalagi, Robin Zhang, RongQing Li, Shay Amir, Steve Yang, Steven Lariau, Tom Rix, Venkata Suresh Kumar P, Vijay Kumar Srivastava, Vikas Gupta, Vimal Chungath, Vipul Ashri, Wei Huang, Wei Ling, Weqaar Janjua, Yi Yang, Yogesh Jangra and Zhenghua Zhou.

Below is the breakout of commits by employer:

     Based on Reviewed-by and Acked-by tags, the top non-PMD reviewers are:

        128     Ferruh Yigit <ferruh.yigit@intel.com>
         68     Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
         63     Andrew Rybchenko <andrew.rybchenko@oktetlabs.ru>
         62     David Marchand <david.marchand@redhat.com>
         53     Ruifeng Wang <ruifeng.wang@arm.com>
         40     Konstantin Ananyev <konstantin.ananyev@intel.com>
         38     Ajit Khaparde <ajit.khaparde@broadcom.com>
         37     Ori Kam <orika@nvidia.com>
         33     Honnappa Nagarahalli <honnappa.nagarahalli@arm.com>

New features for 21.02 may be submitted during the next 3 weeks, in order to be reviewed and integrated before mid-January. DPDK 21.02 should be small in order to release in early February:  https://core.dpdk.org/roadmap#dates

Please share your roadmap.

Thanks to everyone who helped make this release happen – what a great way to wrap up 2020!

MEDIA ADVISORY: Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) Publishes Defining White Paper

By Announcements

SAN FRANCISCO – July 20, 2020 –The Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project, hosted by the Linux Foundation, consists of libraries and drivers to accelerate packet processing workloads running on a wide variety of CPU architectures, today announced the availability of a new white paper entitled, “Myth-busting DPDK in 2020: the past, present, and future of the most popular data plane development kit in the world.

 Produced by Avid Think and Converge! Network Digest with DPDK community support, the paper outlines the critical role DPDK plays in the evolution of networking infrastructure, while dispelling a number of myths and misconceptions about the technology. 

 “DPDK is a robust community that continuously adapts to shifts in technology with the goal of providing optimal value to the networking industry. As the community approaches the tenth anniversary of the project, we are pleased to release a thorough outline of DPDK’s capabilities and upcoming innovations,” said Jim St. Leger, DPDK Board Chair. 

 Topics outlined in the paper include:

  • Explanation/definition of DPDK
  • Market Evolution
  • DPDK Proliferation Across Architectures
  • Infrastructure Acceleration Trends and  DPDK’s Continued Market Evolution
  • What’s next for DPDK

 Download the white paper and check out  related videos on the top 10 DPDK myths, here: https://nextgeninfra.io/dpdk-myth-busting-2020/ 

 DPDK is a robust community of member organizations committed to enabling accessible fast packet processing to help move the networking industry forward. This includes Gold members Arm, AT&T, Ericsson, F5, Intel, Marvell, Mellanox (NVIDIA), Microsoft,  NXP, Red Hat, ZTE; Silver members 6Wind, AMD, Broadcom, Huawei; and Associate members Eötvös Loránd University, KAIST, Tsinghua University, University of Massachusetts Lowell, University of Limerick, and University of New Hampshire-Interoperability Lab. 

DPDK will host its annual DPDK Userspace summit as a virtual experience this year, September 22-23.  Userspace is a community event focused on software developers who contribute to or use DPDK, or are interested in doing so. The event includes presentations on the latest developments across DPDK, as well as in-depth discussions relevant topics to the open source data plane community. Registration is now open

For more information or details on how to participate in the DPDK Project, please visit: www.dpdk.org 

 About DPDK

The Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project consists of libraries and drivers to accelerate packet processing workloads running on a wide variety of CPU architectures. By enabling very fast packet processing, DPDK makes it possible for organizations to move performance-sensitive applications to the cloud. Created in 2010 by Intel and made available under a permissive open source license, the open source community was established at DPDK.org in 2013 by 6WIND and moved under the auspices of The Linux Foundation in 2017. 

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks, including The Linux Foundation. For a full list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) Further Accelerates Packet Processing Workloads, Issues Most Robust Platform Release to Date

By Announcements

DPDK’s 18.05 Release, Named ‘Venky’ in Honor of “the Father of DPDK,” Brings Even Broader High-performance Accelerated Network Support to Cloud and Telco Markets

SAN FRANCISCO – June 21, 2018 – Following the move one year ago to the Linux Foundation, the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project today announced the availability of its milestone DPDK 18.05 ‘Venky’ software release, named after Venky Venkatesan, who was known as “the father of DPDK”. The DPDK project’s 5th major release since joining the Linux Foundation accelerates packet processing workloads running on a wide variety of CPU architectures (including x86, ARM and Power) and supports many enhancements for Encryption, Compression and Packet processing.

Network performance, throughput, and latency are increasingly important for a whole range of applications and implementations such as 5G, Cloud, Network Functions Virtualization (NFV),  wireless core and access, wireline infrastructure, routers, load balancers, firewalls, video streaming, VoIP, SD-WAN, vCPE and more as the ways in which the world communicates rely more and more on fast and stable networks. By enabling very fast packet processing, DPDK makes it possible for organizations to move performance-sensitive applications – like the backbone for mobile networks and voice –  to the Cloud and help create higher performing edge devices.

“The first release of DPDK open source code came out eight years ago; since that time, we’ve built a vibrant community around the DPDK project,” said Jim St. Leger, DPDK Board chair and Data Plane Software Product Marketing Manager, Intel. “We’ve created a series of global DPDK Summit events where the community developers and code consumers gather. The growth in the number of code contributions, participating companies, and developers working on the project continues to reflect the robust, healthy community that the DPDK project is today.”

A true community effort, DPDK 18.05 ‘Venky’ release was built with contributions from over 160 developers, and over 1700 commits across more than 25 organizations.

Key highlights include support for:

  • Compression and Cryptography
  • Dynamic Memory Scaling – faster application launches
  • Event Mode – Hardware or software Event driven scheduler
  • Better Virtual Function Management
  • Updated driver support for Smart NICs, FPGA and System on Chip (SoCs)
  • Future Hardware acceleration of data path, encryption and compression
  • More details here – http://dpdk.org/doc/guides/rel_notes/release_18_05.html

In the year since the project joined the Linux Foundation, DPDK has continued to grow its robust community of 19 member organizations and a broad ecosystem of cross-industry partners: spanning hardware vendors, commercial software vendors,  commercial distros and open source organizations, many of which leverage DPDK, such as:

Since mid-2017 when DPDK joined The Linux Foundation, the project has issued five major new releases, hosted five community summits, and established a lab to perform automated performance testing of new patches.

Another exciting development in DPDK is the ability to run on Microsoft Windows. This is available in a draft repository (http://dpdk.org/browse/draft/dpdk-draft-windows/) and will be merged into the main repository in future releases. This expansion in OS support will help to enable new use cases for DPDK.

The DPDK and FD.io communities recently lost a key founding member of the communities: Venky Venkatesan, known as “the father of DPDK,” passed away following a long illness. The DPDK community expresses its utmost condolences to Venky’s family, friends, and extended community. As a token of appreciation, the DPDK 18.05 release has been re-named in Venky’s honor. Venky was an incredibly inspiring man who exuded greatness all around; he will be dearly missed.

DPDK is comprised of a robust community of member organizations committed to enabling accessible fast packet processing to help move the networking industry forward. This includes Gold members Arm, AT&T, Cavium, Ericsson, F5, Intel, Mellanox, NXP, Red Hat, ZTE; Silver members 6Wind, Broadcom, Huawei, Spirent; and Associate members Eötvös Loránd University, KAIST, Tsinghua University, University of Massachusetts Lowell, and University of Limerick.  

DPDK will host its next DPDK Summit in Beijing, China on June 28. Co-located with LinuxCon + ContainerCon +  Cloud Open China 2018, the agenda will cover the latest developments to DPDK and other related projects, plans for future releases, and updates from DPDK end users. More details, including registration information, are available here: http://linux.31huiyi.com/   

For more information or details on how to participate in the DPDK Project, please visit: www.dpdk.org.

Supporting Quotes

“AT&T is proud of the advancements the DPDK community has accomplished since joining The Linux Foundation a year ago,” said Mazin Gilbert, VP of Advanced Technology at AT&T Labs. “This release further accelerates packet processing workloads, which is critical as we move to the 5G era where we’ll see an explosion of devices and machines requiring high-bandwidth and low-latency connections for applications such as video processing, data analytics, augmented reality and virtual reality, and more.”

“F5 is pleased to see yet another strong delivery by the DPDK.org community. The 18.05 Venky release contains vital enhancements for hardware acceleration which broadens the value proposition for end customers, making this open community even more attractive and valuable to all ecosystem players,”  said Dave Schmitt, Chief Architect, F5 Networks.

About DPDK

The Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project consists of libraries and drivers to accelerate packet processing workloads running on a wide variety of CPU architectures. By enabling very fast packet processing, DPDK makes it possible for organizations to move performance-sensitive applications to the cloud. Created in 2010 by Intel and made available under a permissive open source license, the open source community was established at DPDK.org in 2013 by 6WIND and moved under the auspices of The Linux Foundation in 2017.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks, including The Linux Foundation. For a full list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Cisco announces the traffic generator TRex

By Announcements

Originally posted by Andrew Harvey (agh) agh atcisco.com on the dpdk-dev mailing list 


A couple of people asked me at the SF DPDK Summit about Cisco’s Open
Source Packet Generator that leverages DPDK.

TRex an open source, low cost, stateful traffic generator fueled by DPDK.
It generates L4-7 traffic based on pre-processing and smart replay of real
traffic templates. Trex amplifies both client and server side traffic and
can scale to 200Gb/sec with one Cisco UCS using an Intel XL710.

I know the team would welcome comments and join development to help
extend/improve the project.

https://github.com/cisco-system-traffic-generator